The Drill Down: Apple Secrets, Facebook Payday

Welcome Geeks of Doom readers! The Drill Down is a roundtable-style audio podcast where we discuss the most important issues of the week, in tech and on the web and how they affect us all. You can find all our previous episodes here.

This week, TDD regulars Andrew Sorcini, Dwayne DeFreitas, and Christopher Burnor discuss Fortune reporter Adam Lashinsky‘s Apple exposé, “Inside Apple: How America’s Most Admired – and Secretive – Company Really Works“, and whether the production of Apple products could ever come back to the US. Later we discuss Facebook‘s $5 BN IPO launch.

But first, the headlines: We discuss podcast hosting service Mevio dropping most free users without notice, Next-gen XBox specs, Netflix regains most of their lost subscribers, Warner Bros. further penalizes Netflix users, Twitter allows governments to censor tweets as needed, and President Obama hangs out on Google Plus.

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The Drill Down 217 – ncomment’s War, Part III

© ncomment, used by request

© ncomment, used by permission

On this week’s show, we welcome back Lee Garnett, the brilliant mind behind the social media-conscious online comic, ncomment. Lee guides us through the final chapter of his magnum opus, War, an epic three-part series about Digg, Reddit and the fractious conflicts between social communities.

But first, the headlines: Apple’s head designer Jonathan Ive is knighted, Netflix launches a new series (and double the delay on Warner Bros. content), Yahoo names PayPal’s chief as its CEO, An Android App that helps you fight SOPA, Reddit goes black to protest  SOPA, Lenovo launches an Android-powered TV, Nokia launches the Lumia 900, Kinect comes to Windows, and Google adds personal results to search.

For our Final Word, we ask whether Internet access should be classified as a human right, or a facilitator of human rights.

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The Drill Down 207 – The Unvarnished Truth

This week The Drill Down team discuss Google+’s decision to support pseudonyms, Social network user agreements vs. user-contributed intellectual property rights, Netflix’s quarterly losses, former iPod creators unveil a futuristic thermostat, Rockstar teases GTA V.

Later we discuss the release of Walter Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs and what we’ve learned from it, including future plans for an integrated television. We discuss Nokia’s first ‘true’ Windows phone, the Lumia 800. Also we talk about patents on software from Microsoft and Apple, and the impact they have on the mobile industry.

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The Drill Down 183 – The New Viewership

Click to embiggen.This week Tom Cheredar and Andrew Sorcini are joined by Devindra Hardawar, writer for VentureBeat and co-host of the Symbiotek & Slashfilmcast podcasts.

We discuss the effect the bin Laden raid had on global twitter traffic (and one tweeter in particular), Sony gets hit with a second round of security breaches, Apple updates their iMacs, rental laptops spy on their rentees, Warner Brothers buys Rotten Tomatoes, and The Woz tells Paul Allen to stop trolling.

Later we discuss the decline of TV ownership and DVD/Blu-Ray sales and why that’s an indicator of the new way we watch content; Julian Assange says Facebook is the most appalling spy machine that has ever been invented; and we breakdown the new upcoming Star Wars box sets.

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The Drill Down 176 – Renting Movies on Facebook

This week, The Drill Down team discuss Sony being allowed to acquire IP addresses from anyone who visited PS3  firmware hacker George Hotz’s website, Sprint plans on bringing a 3D EVO phone to the market, Microsoft’s Kinect gets into the Guinness Book of World Records as the fastest selling consumer electronics device, Reddit breaks personal records with their Ask Me Anything subreddit, Apple releases iOS 4.3, Mixx.com’s social news product is dead, but the community lives on at Mixxingbowl.com.

Our in-depth discussion this week is on a Warner Bros. announcement to market movie rentals and purchases via Facebook, using Facebook credits. Finally we finish up with the news that YouTube has purchased video producer Next New Networks, and what that means for the future of YouTube content.

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