Why Teens Are Twitter Shy

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Ahoy! This guest post by 17 year-old blogger extraordinaire Tanner Godarzi (of Apple Matters, iPhone Matters, and his own blog, Tech Blot) is a response to both this July post in The Guardian and this recent post in the New York Times.


photo by Zawsome

A recent article by a Morgan Stanley intern has some across the Twitter-verse surprised that teens don’t user the service as much the older crowd does . Analysts and marketers have been reporting the story but only with the perspective of a single person in the target age group they least understand. Typically, this kind of situation would not be adequate at all as companies pour money and resources in to focus groups and other online surveys just to better understand their target audience, having only one voice in this conversation isn’t enough.

Continue reading “Why Teens Are Twitter Shy”

Sustainability and Survival

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This post, by April Capil is the winner of our recent IOGEAR Laptop KVM Switch contest giveaway. Congratulations, April! Follow April on Twitter.

It was in my oncologist’s office that I realized the connection between breast cancer and sustainable enterprise. As an unemployed GreenMBA diagnosed with Stage III Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, I had understandably bigger fish to fry: my house was a month away from foreclosure; I had just gotten a $27,000 bill from the hospital that did my lumpectomy, and it had only been two weeks since I moved my life 3,000 miles back home to California. The truth is, it was a miracle that I’d even found an oncologist who took my insurance and was accepting new patients. I wasn’t exactly looking for life-changing truths.
“With triple negative cases like yours,” Dr. Kuan was saying, “I like to recommend clinical trials, because there isn’t a drug you can take after chemo and radiation….” I looked at her blankly.  “To keep your cancer from coming back,” she clarified. To keep it from coming back? It had never even occurred to me that my cancer could come back. I’d had two surgeries to cut it out; I was dumping petrochemicals into my body (despite my green values) so that any remaining cells were destroyed. When chemo was over, I was shooting radioactive isotopes into my chest. Why on earth would my cancer come back? For the first time since my diagnosis, I realized I should be doing everything I possibly can to survive. If not, I was in danger of only surviving this round.

Is TechCrunch Turning into Valleywag?

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This is a guest post by Tom Cheredar, a Freelance Journalist/Reporter (and frequent contributor to   http://newassignment.net ) with an affinity for technology and all the wonderful culture it brings.

Months ago Muhammad Saleem pointed out that TechCrunch’s redesign bears a shocking resemblance to the Gawker Media site templates. I thought it was interesting but didn’t give it much thought until this week.

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Seriously, has anyone noticed the first signs of a mini Valleywag reunion over at TechCrunch? It was blatantly obvious  judging from the content this week, which had a bit more pop (sensational) than the regular crop. Typically I expect to find information about web apps, partnerships/(fake aquisitions rumors) and tech start-up announcements. I certainly never expected executive dating coverage involving nude photos of a playboy playmate.

Not this week as it was filled with Newspaper Industry FAILs and plenty of snarky goodness.

The instigators of this reunion are former Valleywag staffer Erick Schonfeld, who switched ships to TechCrunch as Co-editor. But even aside from the questionable articles published lately, I didn’t get the V-wag  vibe until Sarah Lacy joined as a contributor.

This week both reporters take turns jabbing at the crotchety old folks in traditional media with an extra snarky post about how the Associated Press’ legal exec doesn’t know his company has a YouTube channel and then an uppercut to the jaw of journalism schools who are supposedly experiencing enrollment growth (WTF why?).


Making fun of the old media is definitely the most entertaining portion of Valleywag and unlike a “Google / Twitter” acquisition rumor, it’s pretty much a given that ex v-wag contributors know exactly what they’re reporting on. Old media is after all predictable.

TechCrunch, however, is changing into something different.

Throw in Paul Boutin, who is working for the New York Times’ Gadget blog and a possible Owen Thomas (if Gawker Media CEO Nick Denton ever decides to cut out Valleywag completely) and boom: CrunchWag is born.
Why Editor Michael Arrington would want to turn his site into someone else’s Web site that wasn’t financially viable is anyones guess. I’d love to hear his rationale either way.

Will the Diggbar Siphon Your Search Traffic?

This is a guest post by SEO expert Ben Cook

Late last week Digg announced the release of their new Diggbar tool. In his blog post announcing the release, Kevin Rose highlighted the fact the new bar would allow Digg users to vote for a story “directly on the destination site” as well as use Digg.com for all their URL shortening needs for sites such as Twitter. Unfortunately, as TechCrunch pointed out, “unlike other short URL services, Digg doesn’t simply redirect to the longer URL. It keeps you on Digg and shows the site being pointed to in an iframe wrapper.”

The New Diggbar In Action

And therein, lies the problem. Continue reading “Will the Diggbar Siphon Your Search Traffic?”